July 13, 2024

Izdaniya

Education, What Else?

A Principal’s Reflections: #EDvice: Entry Points for Change

3 min read
A Principal’s Reflections: #EDvice: Entry Points for Change

As we all know, navigating change is often a tricky process.  It requires a clear vision, a sound plan for implementation, and patience. Even with all these elements and many others in place, it is rarely a smooth journey.  One of the biggest obstacles to overcome is zeroing in on compelling reasons to change that will lead to better outcomes.  I refer to these as entry points, which can serve as a catalyst for any initiative or strategic plan.  One of the most powerful can be quality research, especially peer-reviewed studies.  I shared the following on social media recently:

Entry points for change are crucial. When trying to get the ball moving, leverage quality research. It can be used to identify areas for improvement to create new and innovative learning methods that better meet the needs of ALL learners. 

In this piece of #EDvice I discuss to vital role research plays in both initiating and sustaining the change process.  

Consider using Google Scholar, which is a great, FREE resource that anyone can use to search for peer-reviewed research on any topic.  Artificial Intelligence can also be used.  I prefer Google Bard over ChatGBT. Recently I asked the following question, “What peer-reviewed research studies support 1:1 laptops in schools?”.  Below you can see the response.

There are a number of peer-reviewed research studies that support the use of 1:1 laptops in schools. These studies have found that laptops can improve student achievement, engagement, and motivation. For example, a study by the Pew Research Center found that students who used laptops in the classroom were more likely to say that they were engaged in their schoolwork and that they felt like they were learning more. Additionally, a study by the National Center for Education Statistics found that students who used laptops in the classroom were more likely to say that they enjoyed school and that they were motivated to learn.

Here are some specific examples of the benefits of 1:1 laptops in schools:

  • Laptops can help students to learn more effectively. For example, students can use laptops to access online resources, collaborate with classmates, and create multimedia projects.
  • Laptops can help students to be more engaged in their learning. For example, students can use laptops to take notes, participate in discussions, and complete assignments.
  • Laptops can help students to be more motivated to learn. For example, students can use laptops to explore their interests, learn at their own pace, and get immediate feedback on their work.
  • Of course, there are also some challenges associated with using laptops in schools. For example, laptops can be a distraction, and they can be expensive to purchase and maintain. However, the benefits of using laptops in schools generally outweigh the challenges.

Overall, the research suggests that 1:1 laptops can be a valuable tool for improving student achievement, engagement, and motivation. If you are considering implementing a 1:1 laptop program in your school, it is important to carefully consider the benefits and challenges involved.

I then asked Bard to cite specific studies.  Here is what was provided

  • Bebell, M., & Kay, A. (2010). Laptops and student achievement: Evidence from a large-scale, urban school district. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 42(4), 357-377.
  • Cheung, A. C. K., & Slavin, R. E. (2013). Effects of one-to-one computing and teacher professional development on student achievement in high school mathematics. American Educational Research Journal, 50(3), 568-596.
  • DeWitt, S. L., & Watson, J. (2013). A review of the research on laptop computers in K-12 education. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 45(4), 347-369.
  • Suhr, J. L., Johnson, C. C., & Lajoie, S. P. (2010). One-to-one computing: A review of the literature. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 42(4), 307-329.
  • Watson, J., & DeWitt, S. L. (2010). Laptops and student achievement: A research synthesis. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 42(4), 329-356.

Research can be a fantastic entry point, but it surely isn’t the only one.  Other great options include evidence (qualitative and quantitative) as well as effective professional learning.  For more insight, check out this post. 

 

Leave a Reply

Copyright © izdaniya.com. | Newsphere by AF themes.